Lake Ray Hubbard
Emergency Pet Care Center

was established in Rowlett in 1997 by a local group of veterinarians to provide high quality emergency and critical care on nights, weekends, and holidays... more

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View Pet's Radiographs Here

If you have visited our hospital and would like to view your pet's radiographs, please enter the patient ID number found on your invoice and medical record.

Using the example below, you would enter 14299 into the search box above.

Client Information:
Mary Wolf (#18098)
204 Rio Grande
Dallas, Texas 75012

Patient Information:
Harry ID= 14299
Shih Tzu, NM White
You are here:
Veterinary Referral Center of East Dallas & Lake Ray Hubbard Emergency Pet Care Center
Cover Shepherd
Cat

The Veterinary Referral Center of East Dallas is a state-of-the-art facility utilizing the most sophisticated and advanced medical and surgical technology. Our staff is highly trained in emergency and critical care medicine and works closely with our surgery and internal medicine specialists to care for your pet's most difficult moments. In the event of an emergency or significant illness, you can be assured that our specially trained staff is prepared and available to provide the very best medical care possible for your pet.

A referral from your veterinarian is not required and you are welcome to contact us directly. Because VRCED is not a general care facility, we will work closely with your family veterinarian to assure your pet receives optimal care. Please ask your veterinarian about VRCED or call us for more information.

Veterinary Referral Center of East Dallas
4651 Belt Line
Mesquite, Texas 75150
972.226.3377
Fax 972.226.0800

Exceptional specialty care for your family pet in a caring and compassionate environment.

Directions to our hospital

 
Emergency Holiday Hours

Emergency services are available 24-hours/day, 365 days/year.

 
What is a Veterinary Specialist

Like human medicine, some veterinarians choose to specialize in one field of medicine.

What makes a veterinarian a "specialist", and should your pet be seen by one?

There are currently 20 veterinary specialties recognized by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association). Specialties range from anesthesiology to zoo medicine. To become a veterinarian, one must first earn an undergraduate degree, which takes 4 years (on average). Admission to veterinary school is competitive, and many applicants apply to more than one school. Veterinary school is 4 years, and upon graduation...

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What's New

Dr. Lynn Britton - VRCEDVRCED welcomes Dr. Lynn Britton to our staff.  Dr. Lynn Britton’s areas of surgical expertise include wound management and reconstruction, fracture repairs, cranial cruciate ligament disease, and intervertebral disc disease while utilizing the latest in medical technology ...

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Interesting Case


KiaraHistory: “Kiara” is a 4 month old Yorkshire terrier that presented for gagging and foaming at the mouth. Her owner stated that she had aggressively taken a treat away from the housemate 30-40 minutes prior to the symptoms starting. “Kiara” has no other medical conditions and is current on all vaccinations.

Exam: “Kiara’s” physical exam was all normal except for a small amount of regurgitation and persistent gulping.

Diagnostics: Radiographs (see radiographs at bottom of page) revealed a large foreign body lodged in the proximal esophagus...

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